History

In the early 1990’s, endovascular treatment using embolic coils for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms was established. Since then, there has been a significant body of peer-reviewed literature written by medical experts regarding the use, safety, and efficacy of these detachable embolic coils. With the publishing of the ISAT (Intracranial Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial) trial data in 2005, which compared clinical outcomes of neurosurgical clipping and endovascular coiling, embolic coiling became the preferred method for treatment of the majority of unruptured intracranial aneurysms [ISAT 2003, Molyneux et al. 2005].

Since then, there has been a revolution in interventional neuroradiology which includes a shift toward catheter based procedures. Unfortunately, for a variety of reasons there are not always endovascular treatment options available to some patients with intracranial aneurysms, especially if the neck of the aneurysm is wide. Additionally there is a range of concerns relating to patient comorbidities, aneurysm geometry or the location of the lesion. Consequently there are many challenges, even today, when treating patients with such lesions. Hence there has been significant research in this arena to develop adjunctive devices to be used with embolic coils as well as sole therapy devices.